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Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Back to top: Patriot's Lament December 10th 2011, Bury the myth of nullification!!!

I was listening to this today and decided to repost it. Get it out of your head. There is no Santa Claus, tooth fairy, or State nullification.
This is a total police State.

9 comments:

  1. Bah! Resist! I haven't listened to the show, yet, but state nullification exists! virginia nullified the NDAA!

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  2. I never said not to resist.
    I said there is no such thing as state nullification.
    So what if Virginia passes a law saying they won't give material support to any federal agency who comes into Virginia to indefinitely detain a Virginian citizen?
    What good does that do the Virginian? They still get detained?
    "We won't help the feds".
    "We will just turn a blind eye".
    Where is the protection from the Feds? It's a worthless gesture.
    Google FBI raids Virginia.
    How many of those raids had a warrant that was presented?
    What is Virginia doing about it?

    Phffffft.

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    Replies
    1. True and good point. However, The NDAA nullification laws I am aware of, in more than just Virginia, give the local authorities the right to defend their citizens from frederal kidnappers. Now, they may not have done it yet, but as more disappearings happen the more the people will likely demand it, and it will be advantageous for those communities to have explicitly the law on their side.

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  3. I never said not to resist.
    I said there is no such thing as state nullification.
    So what if Virginia passes a law saying they won't give material support to any federal agency who comes into Virginia to indefinitely detain a Virginian citizen?
    What good does that do the Virginian? They still get detained?
    "We won't help the feds".
    "We will just turn a blind eye".
    Where is the protection from the Feds? It's a worthless gesture.
    Google FBI raids Virginia.
    How many of those raids had a warrant that was presented?
    What is Virginia doing about it?

    Phffffft.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I wanted to respond further when I found time re-listen to your interview with Michael Boldin. I haven't so from memory, I remember enjoying the interview and I do NOT remember you making the point during the interview that state nullification is fictious like the tooth fairy and a waste of time. Am I correct?

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  5. Furthermore, it does seem that a couple states are having success in nullifying marijuana laws. It is a start, and it isn't fantasy. If you live in a state where people could potsntially value liberty over party, it could help.

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  6. I am not against nullification, I am just saying how is it working? Just because some states made marijuana legal doesn't mean the federal law is nullified. The Feds will still be in those states arresting people.
    A judge here in Alaska recently upheld the 4th amendment requiring warrants. But the FBI still makes arrests and goes into peoples homes without them here in Alaska. So the point is, the States can blab all they want and pass whatever law they feel like Nullifying whatever law, but the Feds will/do ignore those laws/nullification. So in practical terms, nullification is bunk. When the States pass these nullification laws and then actually arrest Federal agents for violating them, then I will say you are right.
    Like I said, I am all for State nullification, but they have no teeth.

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  7. I don't disagree, but I think is a good move in the right direction. Just like the feds are putting in place orwellian laws that they aren't using brazenly like the ndaa they are setting a trap. It is good for states to have laws in place for the potential to counteract.

    I also think that now, when the feds do prosecute marijuana users in legal states, that it will open more minds and cause more controversy, which is a good point for us. Popular opinion may sway our way if they crack down too hard or continue to do so.

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  8. I don't think it is a waste of time or an imaginary santa clause. Sure reading and self improvement is more worthwhile than any political action, but this isn't a bad use of time either in my opinion, and is the only worthwhile for of political action left.

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